Nepal Now: On the move

Measuring human rights in Nepal

October 12, 2022 Marty Logan / Stephen Bagwell Season 4 Episode 13
Measuring human rights in Nepal
Nepal Now: On the move
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Nepal Now: On the move
Measuring human rights in Nepal
Oct 12, 2022 Season 4 Episode 13
Marty Logan / Stephen Bagwell

Send us a Text Message.

Welcome to Nepal Now, the podcast where we discuss new ideas and approaches to move the country forward. My name is Marty Logan.

Thanks for joining me for this episode, which, if you’re counting, is #52. You might be wondering what happened to the video version of the last episode, my chat with Sanjib Chaudhary. Well, that’s a good question. I received a rough cut and suggested two changes — and weeks later I’m still waiting for the updated version. I promise to let you know if it ever appears.

If you’ve been listening to Nepal Now for a while you’ll know that I sometimes switch up the usual 1-1 interview format. A couple episodes back I was at a college collecting opinions from journalism students, and before that I twice visited a village in Sindhupalchowk district, to see the state of maternal health.

Today is also different. This episode is based on an interview I first recorded for Strive, a podcast I host for Inter Press Service – or IPS – News. We talked so much about Nepal, as an example, that I thought you might be interested in hearing it too. The focus is human rights, specifically a new approach to assessing countries’ human rights performance.

I’ve been reporting about human rights for many years and I know that more often than not governments will respond to articles about serious violations, including killings, by saying that it didn’t happen that way or even if it did, it was a one-time incident that doesn’t represent a pattern. I think those types of reactions might be happening more often in this age of misinformation and disinformation.

Too often the issue ends there, with no consequences. The great thing about today’s topic, the Human Rights Measurement Initiative’s Rights Tracker, is that it quantifies governments’ performances, based on objective data, in some cases, and on in-depth interviews in others. It’s not a perfect system, as you’ll hear, but combined with the existing ‘naming and shaming’ approach, it could be a better way to ensure that human rights are respected.

Please listen now to my chat with Stephen Bagwell from HRMI and the University of Missouri, St Louis.

Resources

Human Rights Measurement Initiative

Nepal page on HRMI's Rights Tracker


Nepal Now social links

Facebook

Instagram

Twitter

LinkedIn


Thanks as always to Nikunja Nepal for advice and inspiration.

Music: amaretto needs ice ... by urmymuse (c) copyright 2018 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial  (3.0) license. http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/urmymuse/57996 Ft: Apoxode


Send us feedback and ideas. We'll respond to every message:

LinkedIn

Instagram

Facebook

Voicemail

Music by audionautix.com.

Thank you to the Association of Community Radio Broadcasters of Nepal and Himal Media for use of their studios.

Show Notes

Send us a Text Message.

Welcome to Nepal Now, the podcast where we discuss new ideas and approaches to move the country forward. My name is Marty Logan.

Thanks for joining me for this episode, which, if you’re counting, is #52. You might be wondering what happened to the video version of the last episode, my chat with Sanjib Chaudhary. Well, that’s a good question. I received a rough cut and suggested two changes — and weeks later I’m still waiting for the updated version. I promise to let you know if it ever appears.

If you’ve been listening to Nepal Now for a while you’ll know that I sometimes switch up the usual 1-1 interview format. A couple episodes back I was at a college collecting opinions from journalism students, and before that I twice visited a village in Sindhupalchowk district, to see the state of maternal health.

Today is also different. This episode is based on an interview I first recorded for Strive, a podcast I host for Inter Press Service – or IPS – News. We talked so much about Nepal, as an example, that I thought you might be interested in hearing it too. The focus is human rights, specifically a new approach to assessing countries’ human rights performance.

I’ve been reporting about human rights for many years and I know that more often than not governments will respond to articles about serious violations, including killings, by saying that it didn’t happen that way or even if it did, it was a one-time incident that doesn’t represent a pattern. I think those types of reactions might be happening more often in this age of misinformation and disinformation.

Too often the issue ends there, with no consequences. The great thing about today’s topic, the Human Rights Measurement Initiative’s Rights Tracker, is that it quantifies governments’ performances, based on objective data, in some cases, and on in-depth interviews in others. It’s not a perfect system, as you’ll hear, but combined with the existing ‘naming and shaming’ approach, it could be a better way to ensure that human rights are respected.

Please listen now to my chat with Stephen Bagwell from HRMI and the University of Missouri, St Louis.

Resources

Human Rights Measurement Initiative

Nepal page on HRMI's Rights Tracker


Nepal Now social links

Facebook

Instagram

Twitter

LinkedIn


Thanks as always to Nikunja Nepal for advice and inspiration.

Music: amaretto needs ice ... by urmymuse (c) copyright 2018 Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial  (3.0) license. http://dig.ccmixter.org/files/urmymuse/57996 Ft: Apoxode


Send us feedback and ideas. We'll respond to every message:

LinkedIn

Instagram

Facebook

Voicemail

Music by audionautix.com.

Thank you to the Association of Community Radio Broadcasters of Nepal and Himal Media for use of their studios.